Last updated Saturday, October 25, 2014 05:23pm

(From left)  Malaysia Airlines CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya, Director General of the Department of Civil Aviation Datuk Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, Acting Minister of Transport Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Tun Hussein and the Inspector General of Police Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar at the daily MH370 press conference at Sama Sama Hotel in KLIA, on March 16, 2014. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng(From left) Malaysia Airlines CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya, Director General of the Department of Civil Aviation Datuk Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, Acting Minister of Transport Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Tun Hussein and the Inspector General of Police Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar at the daily MH370 press conference at Sama Sama Hotel in KLIA, on March 16, 2014. — Picture by Saw Siow FengSEPANG, March 16 — No hazardous goods were loaded onto missing Malaysia Airlines (MAS) flight MH370, the airline’s group CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya said today.

Jauhari said the cargo on the Boeing 777-200 ER plane was checked and scanned according to standard procedures.

“We examined the cargo manifest, it contains no hazardous goods,” he told reporters at the Sama-Sama hotel here.

Ahmad Jauhari added that the MH370 flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing would have taken six-and-a-half hours, but that the jetliner had fuel reserves of between 45 minutes and an hour to allow for delays.

Inspector-General of Police (IGP) Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar, who was also at the press conference, said that some foreign security agencies have cleared all 227 passengers on the plane in their background checks.

But he noted that some countries have yet to respond to Malaysia’s vetting requests.

He also said that the investigation into MH370 that vanished in the early morning of March 8 is now classified under Section 130C of the Penal Code that deals with hijacking, sabotage, and other acts of terrorism.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak said yesterday that MH370 was diverted deliberately after someone on board switched off the plane’s communications systems, an act which experts say would require extensive flight experience.

Flight MH370 disappeared shortly after it departed Kuala Lumpur International Airport for Beijing on March 8 with 239 people on board.