Last updated Saturday, August 30, 2014 08:06pm

Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Matthew Walton sprays down a P-8A Poseidon with fresh water before its flight to assist in search and rescue operations for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in Kuala Lumpur March 18, 2014 in this US navy handout photo. — Reuters picAviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Matthew Walton sprays down a P-8A Poseidon with fresh water before its flight to assist in search and rescue operations for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in Kuala Lumpur March 18, 2014 in this US navy handout photo. — Reuters picKUALA LUMPUR, March 19 — A Canadian electromagnetics expert has dismissed talk that the missing MH370 Boeing 777 aircraft could have been hidden from radar using electronic warfare technology, calling it “impossible”.

Toronto University researcher Dr George Eleftheriades said in a report in The Star today that the invisibility technology was still in the laboratory stage and is not yet available.

“Moreover, it would seem impossible to fit the airplane with such a cloak while in flight,” Eleftheriades was quoted as saying.

According to a CNN report in November last year, Eleftheriades and PhD student Michael Selvanayagam had found a new way to cloak large objects using tiny antennas.

Citing a paper published at the time in the Physical Review X journal, such “cloaking technology” generally would not make objects invisible to the human eye but undetectable by radar.

“They can even control the signals bouncing back to make objects seem larger or smaller than they already are,” CNN reported.

According to the report, the two researchers used nanoantennas to radiate an electromagnetic field to prevent waves from a certain object from reflecting back to a radar detector.

“The small antennas can be even printed flat to create a flexible skin for the desired object,” CNN reported.

“While the technology only works for radio waves at the moment, the researchers say the same principles could be applied to other waves such as light waves, which could potentially hide an object from the human eye.”

From a possible terror attack to pilot suicide, many theories have arisen since the Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 went missing on March 8 with 239 people on board. Search for the missing plane, now entering its 12th day, has expanded to 7.68 million square kilometres, which is an area the size of Australia.

In the Gallery


  • Peter Chong holds a smartphone displaying a picture of himself with missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah (right) during an interview with Reuters at a hotel in Sepang March 18, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A child leaves a message of support for family members and passengers onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur March 18, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A Pakistani Christian girl holds a candle to pray for the passengers and crew members of the missing Malaysia Airline flight MH370 in Islamabad March 18, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Pakistani Christians hold candles to pray for the passengers and crew members of the missing Malaysia Airline flight MH370, in Islamabad March 18, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • People turn the lights of their phones towards the sky during a special event and prayer for the passengers of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in central Kuala Lumpur March 18, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Women pray during a special event for the passengers of the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 in central Kuala Lumpur March 18, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Messages of support are hung during a special event for the passengers of the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 in central Kuala Lumpur March 18, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • People attend a special event for the passengers of the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 in central Kuala Lumpur March 18, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Relatives of passengers onboard missing flight MH370 complain to an official from Malaysia Airlines after the company's briefing to family members at a hotel in Beijing March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A relative of a passenger onboard missing flight MH370 is seen through a door while he waits for news at a hotel in Beijing March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A relative of a passenger onboard the missing flight MH370 is seen through a door while he waits for news at a hotel in Beijing March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A poem (top) for missing flight MH370 and announcements from Malaysia Airlines are attached on a pillar of a room for family members and friends of passengers onboard the flight at a hotel in Beijing March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A relative of a passenger onboard the missing flight MH370 asks questions to officials from Malaysia Airlines during the company's briefing to family members at a hotel in Beijing March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A woman writes a message on a board dedicated to passengers onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 and their family members, in Petaling Jaya March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Visitors write well-wishes for passengers onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 and their family, in Kuala Lumpur March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A visitor hangs a card with well-wishes for passengers onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 and their families, in Kuala Lumpur March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A woman walks past screens showing flight information and a ‘Pray for MH370’ sign at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A combination photo shows various artwork put up by members of the public for missing MH370 at a viewing gallery in KLIA March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A Chinese family member of a passenger onboard the missing MH370 screams outside the media conference area at a hotel in Sepang March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A Chinese family member of a passenger onboard the missing MH370 screams as she is being brought into a room at a hotel near KLIA March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A Chinese family member (red shirt) of a missing MH370 passenger is escorted away from the media at a hotel near KLIA March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A Chinese family member of a missing MH370 passenger is escorted away from the media at a hotel near KLIA March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A Chinese family member of a missing MH370 passenger is escorted away from the media at a hotel near KLIA March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Chinese family members of passengers onboard the missing MH370 are escorted away from the media at a hotel, near KLIA March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A journalist breaks free from the police who stopped media chasing after Chinese family members of passengers onboard the missing MH370 at a hotel near KLIA March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Police block reporters from following Chinese family members of the missing MH370 passengers at a hotel near KLIA March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A woman holds a candle during a special prayer for passengers onboard missing MH370 in Kuala Lumpur March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A woman holds a candle during a special prayer for passengers onboard missing MH370 in Kuala Lumpur March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Malaysian women hold candles during a special prayer for passengers onboard missing MH370 in Kuala Lumpur March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Malaysians hold candles during a special prayer for passengers onboard the missing MH370 in Kuala Lumpur March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • An image in support of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 is seen on the Umno building in Kuala Lumpur March 19, 2014. — Reuters pic

Aircraft and sea vessels from 26 nations have joined the physical search at land and sea, while both local and foreign investigators, military and aviation experts continue to huddle over fragmented satellite and radar data to look for signs of the missing aircraft.

The magnitude of the search, the size of rescue operations, the multi-nation cooperation and the plausible theories surrounding MH370 have been described by many as “unprecedented”, likely making this the most baffling mysteries in aviation history.

As Malaysian Airlines (MAS) chief executive officer Ahmad Jauhari admitted yesterday, after dismissing speculation suggesting the plane’s flight route had been programmed to veer off-course, once inside the aircraft, “anything is possible”.