Last updated Saturday, August 30, 2014 02:02pm

The US Federal Bureau of Investigation found no incriminating evidence from the hard drives and a flight simulator taken from the homes of the two aviators on Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 on March 15. — Reuters picThe US Federal Bureau of Investigation found no incriminating evidence from the hard drives and a flight simulator taken from the homes of the two aviators on Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 on March 15. — Reuters picKUALA LUMPUR, March 28 — The US Federal Bureau of Investigation recovered no incriminating evidence from the hard drives and a flight simulator belonging to two pilots on Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, the New York Times reported citing anonymous sources.

According to two unnamed individuals informed of the US investigators’ findings, information obtained from the items taken from the homes of the two aviators on March 15 yielded few clues that could further the probe into the plane’s disappearance on March 8 with 239 people on board.

But one of the sources, a former US law enforcement agent, said this did not mean that the data should be discarded.

“Something on the drive which does not seem important today could be, when viewed with additional data obtained from the background of the individual, his other activity, interviews and data from the flight recorded,” the source told the NYT.

Malaysia announced on March 15 that MH370 was diverted from its path to Beijing through deliberate action and that it was now focusing investigations on the 12 crew and 227 passengers on board.

Attention has fallen most on the two pilots — captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah and Fariq Ab Hamid — as investigators insist the circumstances of the plane’s diversion required piloting and avionics expertise.

Investigators also said all 227 passengers were cleared by intelligence agencies from all countries whose nationals were on board, save for Russia

Malaysian police previously said the data logs from the simulator Zaharie built himself were deleted on February 3. The simulator was later sent along with drives from the two pilots’ computers to the FBI’s forensics lab in Quantico, Virginia.

On Wednesday, the AFP news agency reported that FBI director James Comey said he expected his agency to finish an investigation of computer files related to the MH370 in the next one or two days.

“I have teams working really around the clock to exploit that,” Comey said. “I don't want to say more about that in an open setting, but I expect it to be done fairly shortly. Within a day or two we will finish that work.”

In the Gallery


  • Airbourne Electronics Analyst Ben Herbert looks out an observation window from a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft while searching for the missing MAS flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 26, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Crew members take a break aboard a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft while searching for the missing MAS flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 26, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Flight Engineer Ron Day (right) and fellow crew members look out from the cockpit of a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft while searching for the missing MAS flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 26, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Flight Lieutenant Russell Adams (left) and Flight Engineer Scott Jones look out from the cockpit of a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft while searching for the missing MAS flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 26, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Flight Lieutenant Russell Adams looks out from the cockpit of an RAAF AP-3C Orion aircraft while searching for the missing MAS flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 26, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Ground staff assist a Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN) P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft after it arrived at the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Base Pearce, located north of Perth, March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A Chinese Air Force Ilyushin Il-76 aircraft used in the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 prepares to land at Perth International Airport, March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A crew member of a Chinese Air Force Ilyushin Il-76 aircraft used in the search for missing MAS flight MH370 walks on the roof of the aircraft at Perth International Airport, March 27 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN) P3-C Orion aircraft arrives at the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Base Pearce, to participate in the search for missing MAS flight MH370, March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A ground controller guides a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion to rest upon its return to RAAF base Pearce near Perth, March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A ground controller guides a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion to rest upon its return to RAAF base Pearce near Perth, March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A navigation screen used by pilots aboard an RAAF AP-3C Orion aircraft during the search for MAS flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion aircraft is pictured after returning from a search flight for MAS flight MH370, at RAAF Base Pearce near Perth, March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A relative (centre) of a passenger aboard MAS MH370 reacts as she enters a meeting room with volunteers from Malaysia (in blue vests) at the Lido Hotel in Beijing March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Relatives of passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines MH370 takes picture of a screen while a slideshow is for MH370 passengers is playing at the Lido Hotel in Beijing March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Volunteers from Taiwan pray for the passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines MH370 while family members of the passengers play a slideshow about the passengers at Lido Hotel in Beijing March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • Volunteers from Taiwan pray for the passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines MH370 while family members of the passengers play a slideshow about the passengers at Lido Hotel in Beijing March 27, 2014. — Reuters pic

  • A small group of Malaysians hold candles at a candlelight vigil for passengers on board the missing MAS flight MH370 at the Bangsar Village shopping mall, on March 27, 2014. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng

  • Datin Paduka Marina Mahathir speaks at a candlelight vigil for passengers on board the missing MAS flight MH370 at the Bangsar Village shopping mall, on March 27, 2014. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng

  • A small group of Malaysians hold candles at a candlelight vigil for passengers on board the missing MAS flight MH370 at the Bangsar Village shopping mall, on March 27, 2014. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng

  • A woman holds a candle at a candlelight vigil for passengers on board the missing MAS flight MH370 at the Bangsar Village shopping mall, on March 27, 2014. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng

  • A group of people light candles in memory of those on board the missing MAS flight MH370 at the Bangsar Village shopping mall, on March 27, 2014. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng

  • A paper crane hanging from a tree at the Bangsar Village shopping mall, on March 27, 2014. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng

Comey did not say what results he expected from the FBI's analysis.

He also denied allegations that Malaysian authorities had not been open to assistance offered by the FBI in the investigation of MH370, which has been missing for over two weeks.

The search for the plane that disappeared on March 8 while bound for Beijing with 239 on board is now converging on a remote location in the southern Indian Ocean 2,500km southwest of Perth, after Malaysia announced on Monday that satellite data showed the flight “ended somewhere” in the waters there.

The airlines told families of the plane’s passengers and crew that it “assumed beyond reasonable doubt” that the plane was lost with no survivors.