Friday September 8, 2017
02:52 PM GMT+8

UPDATED:
September 09, 2017
05:04 PM GMT+8

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NEW YORK, Sept 8 — Scrambled eggs are a beautiful thing. Quick, simple. Healthy with vegetables or gluttonous when smothered in butter, sausage and cheese. They can be recovery fuel from a late night out or a fast, hot meal before work or school. Just as important: Anyone can make them.

Just whisk eggs and pour them onto a skillet.

Right?

Grilled cheese sandwich (left) and a typical ‘breakfast’ of buttered toast, ham, baked beans and scrambled eggs. — Picture by KE OoiGrilled cheese sandwich (left) and a typical ‘breakfast’ of buttered toast, ham, baked beans and scrambled eggs. — Picture by KE Ooi

Michelin-starred chef Daniel Patterson says there’s a better way, using boiling water, similar to a poached egg. Patterson, who founded Coi in San Francisco, says his method makes for an easier cleanup while avoiding any health risks associated with using Teflon-coated nonstick pans. He said he perfected his technique through trial and error.

An earlier article about the method by Bloomberg’s Kate Krader was met with some skepticism. She tested the recipe prior to publication, and we decided to document a follow-up effort.

Our verdict: They’re light and fluffy. But they were also quite watery and still left a mess in the kitchen. The pot wasn’t too egg-coated, but the strainer was annoying to clean.

Our pro tips:

Don’t salt the eggs until after you cook them. We added salt while whisking, which Patterson says would have made the eggs less cohesive and stable.

Ensure the water has a good, strong whirlpool before adding eggs. That keeps the eggs concentrated in the center, prevents little strands from sinking.

Use a slotted spoon to skim them from the water bath. Don’t be afraid to allow extra boiling time. — Bloomberg

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